Day Eight: ‘We hear of the huge numbers who have died, but when someone in your own family becomes one of those, suddenly everything seems different’

Contributor: Rebecca:

“This weekend the weird and sometimes somewhat abstract situation of the coronavirus pandemic came home to us.


Beloved Aunty Bunty died on Sunday.


She had been taken into A&E on Saturday, while there her heart stopped and although they resuscitated her, she was just too poorly and died on Sunday. 
It’s difficult to find the words to express the shock and sadness that has accompanied this news. Multiple times per day we read and hear the news of the huge numbers of people who have already died and the projected numbers who will die around the world and we’re all hoping (& trying) not to contract the virus, but when someone in your own family becomes one of those facts and figures, suddenly everything seems different.
Bunty was only one of an unguessable number of Global deaths that will be marked in history books, but she was special to us. She was a Londoner, the youngest of 9 – Andy’s Dad had been the eldest of that tribe. Along with her sister June, as GI brides Bunty & June moved to the States after the war. Having been widowed in the last few years, Bunty leaves five children, 14 grandchildren and a few great grandchildren too! Along with one remaining brother and sister and 17 neices and nephews (I’ve lost count of how many great nieces and nephews etc) the extended family of the Smiths is, joking aside, a massive family. 
Aunty Bunty was a happy, bubbly, funny and cheeky person, but we won’t be able to go to her funeral to celebrate her life and remind each other amusing anecdotes.  All we can do is send messages of love and sympathy, and hope that maybe next year, god willing all of those listed above can gather and be grateful for the lives we will be leading.”